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Confessions of a Superhero

Posted by admin on May 16, 2012

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Acting is something that rarely makes money. There are thousands, maybe, millions of people that have dreams of becoming a celebrity, only to have it shattered overnight. There are those that have luck. Only those that have a great gift (and a great agent) are going to make it to the Academy Awards. Once those people have walked the red carpet and have been awarded the gold, they are forever imprinted in Hollywood’s history. But for many hopefuls, they do things that are embarrassing, yet know that people will be watching them. It’s not movie acting, or television acting. It’s not even extra background work. These people are superheroes.

They are the people that become Superman, Batman, the Hulk, and whoever they want to be in order to make money and play “some” part. In this odd, yet interesting documentary, we get an up-close look at the costumed superheroes out on Hollywood Boulevard. They are the ones that go up to tourists asking to take photos, and maybe getting a buck or two. Confessions of a Superhero dwells into how this is the lowest of the low for all these wannabes. These people have been chewed up and spat out by Hollywood, yet they still fight to have a shot at the celebrity dreams.

Like a proper superhero film, we get the origin stories on the four people were chronicling. Up first is a Superman played by Dennis. He’s a die-hard fan of the same name hero and he said that he’s been doing this longer then his friends. He also claims to be the son of the late Sandy Dennis (who you probably remember from her Oscar winning performance in Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?). His story is the most interesting, because while he’s chasing the fame game, he’s the only one who really enjoys playing the man of steal.

Next we have Wenger, a twenty-something girl who’s our Wonder Woman. She was once captain of the cheerleading team and all honors, but after High School, she moved to L.A. to become an actress. Then we have the Hulk, or McQueen who moved during the infamous Rodney King riots and was homeless for several years. Finally, we’ve got Batman. He’s played by Allen, who wants a new life to wash away his former mobster lifestyle. He was the one I felt most sorry for, as he has several psychological problems, living in poverty, and at one point gets arrested for initiating a fight.

Briefly upsetting, Confessions of a Superhero is mostly motivating. Though these heroes are nowhere close to where they want to be, they have the sprits of the characters their playing. They never give up their dreams, even if what they do is worse then shoveling dog poo. I would have gave up rather then dressing up as a phony. But what this documentary seems to be identifying is that Hollywood is full of phonies like them. If you want to be an actor, be prepared for a cruel and competitive job.

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These “heroes” are getting four bad Batman outfits out of five. If you’re looking to make money out of acting, then your in the wrong job. Only take a creative career if you really love doing what you do. I hope that something good comes for our heroes, but until they defeat the villain known as rejection, they remain grounded.

 

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